Hostesses from across Canada for the Indian Pavilion at EXPO '67
Hostesses from across Canada for the Indian Pavilion at EXPO '67

Hostesses from across Canada for the Indian Pavilion at EXPO '67
United Church of Canada Pacific Mountain Region Archives

[1967?]
Image > Photograph, Print Media
Curatorial Comment
The "Indians of Canada" pavilion at Expo 67 was intended to be representative of all Aboriginal communities across Canada. Its architecture drew from symbols of various Indigenous peoples of the land, and on exhibit inside were works by Indigenous artists from diverse Aboriginal backgrounds. Prominently visible on entry to the pavilion was a totem pole carved by Henry and Tony Hunt of Alert Bay, B.C. Young "hostesses" were recruited from several different First Nations to provide tours of the pavilion. But the tone inside the pavilion was reportedly bitter and provocative; Aboriginal artists expressed what it was like to be an Aboriginal person in Canada, including the references to the unhappy experiences of children in Indian Residential Schools.

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More Information

Commission Object Identifier
38f-c000941-d0001-013
Extent and Medium

1 print : b&w ; 25.5 x 20.5 cm

Notes
Full caption: "Hostesses from across Canada for the Indian Pavilion at EXPO '67 represent many proud Indian heritages . . . Micmac, Mohawk, Ojibway, Saulteaux, Blackfoot, Cree, Okanagan, Kwakiutl, Haida, and Hare"
Terms Governing Use and Reproduction
Copyright holder: The United Church of Canada
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